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ATG Training for Endurance Athletes

Question:

Hey guys! 💙

ATG has kind of spoiled me (in a good way ofc). These last few months I’ve felt 10x more motivated to go to the gym than to do my swim/bike/run sessions 🤪… Totally opposite of ALL other triathletes. But here I am..

I really feel that I benefit from this style of strength training in many ways BUT I’m courious to know if there are other professional endurance athletes in the community and how they balance ATG training with their actual sport as the race season is in full swing. With weeks of 20-35hrs of swim, bike and run in season I find it interesting experimenting with the minimum dose of ATG to still feel like I get the most important benefits (injury prevention, fatique resilience and mobility for the time trial position on the bike)

My coach allows me to do lots of strength training during winter / off season to build a solid foundation (so already looking forward to my first winter with full ATG program coming up 😉), but in season he wants me to stay away from the heavy weights and only do core work + stretching as the bike and run sessions gets a lot tougher and requires relatively fresh legs to execute (and the total accumulation gets higher)

But I really feel that my body NEEDS some actual strength training to stay strong and prevent getting those small niggles - also in season.

Happy to hear any thoughts 🙏🏼 

But anyways I will keep testing over the next months/years to find the best possible recipe for me and hopefully be able to help other athletes with the same thing ☺️📈


Answer:

Benjamin I know the ATG experience in endurance sports is still relatively low. But I’ve observed a few things:

1. Many of the world’s greatest athletes succeeded “in spite” of more rest than their competition. For example Michael Jordan didn’t take basketball seriously until age 16. I had fucked up knees by age 12. He succeeded BECAUSE of that, not in spite of it.

2. Jonathan Edwards world record still stands and he was sick for like 6 MONTHS not long before.

3. Recently a world record was almost broken and the athlete has been doing ATG for 2 years now and was sick for like 10 days prior.

On the other hand I would suck at triathlon because I don’t train for it at all. There’s going to be some line in there that’s best. It’s probably going to be:

1. Less wearing down your body than your competitors

2. More bulletproofing reserve and strength than your competitors

Example:

I once trained a cyclist who SHOCKED himself at his event after a solid few months of training with me. He went from cycling 6 days to 3 and did 3 strength sessions jacking up his ability = massive cycling PRs.

Every sport may have a different line. And your own strengths and weaknesses determine your potential.

Kobe was famous for his work ethic on his skills. But he could dunk between his legs at age 18. And didn’t grow up in the American system destroying his body. He grew up with a balance of soccer in Europe and none of these crazy tournaments with excessive games that all us Americans do. And he got to the NBA with rough skills but world class athleticism.

Michael Jordan

Kobe Bryant

Lebron James

The most-discussed as the basketball GOATs, none grew up like normal American basketball players. Lebron played football and was a star there too. 

Physically impossible any of those guys worked as hard on basketball as I did growing up. Worse genetics + more beating = me. So it’s likely for triathlon that you can find a game changing recipe compared to everyone else.

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